Passer au contenu principal

logoCorrectSize.png

Adaptive Insights French

Access Rules Management – General Guidelines and Examples

Enabling Access Rules in your Adaptive Insights model allows for level, account, and dimensional access to be granted to individual users and groups.  With the additional capability comes additional administration that administrators should 1) be aware of and 2) be able to manage on their own.  This document is provided as an additional resource to help administrators understand how Access Rule files are created and work and to provide several examples of common use cases.  

For the purposes of this example, we will use the following Level hierarchy:

 The example model includes standard GL accounts and Revenue and Personnel sheets.

Key Access Rule behaviors – It is important to understand how access rules behave.

  • Rules are additive – any number of rules can be created for any level, users, group, etc.

  • Rule order does not matter.

  • The most permissive rule for any given intersection always takes precedence – this is important to understand.  You will see that rules often intersect one another.  The rules that provide the greatest access for any given intersections will always be the rules applied to the intersections.  

  • Giving access to a parent level, account, or dimension element automatically applies the same access to all of its children.

  • Giving access to a modeled or cube sheet by name automatically applies the access to the whole sheet.

Access Levels – the following access levels, in order of precedence, can be granted by Users or Groups to Levels, Accounts, and secured Dimensions.

  • Edit: You can edit the data. 

  • Full View: You can view the data and all its supporting details.

  • Limited View:  You can't view the supporting details of the data, including splits, transactions, and rows in modeled sheets.

  • None: You don't have a rule assigned to you, or you don't have rules that grant access to at least one level. 

Graphical view of Access Rules – For purposes of planning and illustration, creating a matrix in MS Excel can help visualize the results of multiple, intersecting rules.  The following matrix will be used to illustrate the examples in this article. 


 

Example 1: Sales Manager for Sales – North (SalesNorth@company.com) has edit access to all accounts and sheet in in Sales – North.

Rule – (+) for Account (Grant) indicates Grant Access to all accounts:

 

Result for SalesNorth@company.com:


 

Example 2: Sales Manager for Sales – North (SalesNorth@company.com) has edit access to all accounts and sheet in Sales – North except Personnel.

Rule – Personnel (Personnel sheet name) highlighted excludes all accounts in the personnel sheet.

Result for SalesNorth@company.com:

Note: Restricting the Personnel sheet does not restrict the values of other accounts that have formulas pointing to the account in the sheet.  Users will still be able to see the other account but will not be able to drill to the Personnel sheet details.  The resulting cell formula will look like the following:


 

Example 3: US Sales Manager (SalesUS@company.com) has View access to all accounts and sheets in US Sales departments. 

Rule – Access applies DOWN until the next Access Type is encountered.  Access must be the same for all members of a group (highlighted area):

Note:  When adding multiple items per column for a single access rule, the values in other columns are not required to be copied.  In the case above, the (+) in the Account (Grant) column applies to rows 7 through 10.

Result for SalesUS@company.com:


 

Example 4: US Sales Manager (SalesUS@company.com) has Edit access to all accounts and Full View access to the Personnel sheet in US Sales departments. 

Rule – The rule at row 7 give Edit access to all accounts and sheets except the Personnel sheet.  The rule at row 12 give Full View access to all accounts and sheets.  Since Full View is more permissive than no access for the Personnel sheet, the Personnel sheet gets full view access.

Result for SalesUS@company.com:


 

Example 5: The VP of Operations (VpofOps@company.com)  has Full View access to all of Operations.

Rule – The rule at row 17 gives the VP of Operations Full View access to the Operations level and all its children.

Result for VPofOps@company.com – Note – user will have view access to all children of Operations, not just the sales levels shown.


 

Example 6: The Marketing Manager (Marketing@company.com) has Edit access to all Expense accounts but no access to the Personnel Sheet or any other modeled or cube sheets. 

Rule – The rule on row 19 restricts the Marketing Manager to just 6000_Operating_Expenses and its children for the Marketing department.  This results in the Marketing Manager only having Edit access to sheets that include the given accounts.  The Marketing Manager does not have access to any other sheets including the Personnel sheet since all of those account have no access by default.

Note:  When adding multiple items per column for a single access rule, the values in other columns are not required to be copied.  In the case above, the (+) in the Account (Grant) column applies to rows 7 through 10.

TIP:  Account codes are required for granting access to specific accounts and their children where as modeled and cubed sheet names are required for granting access to all accounts within those sheets (does not apply to standard sheets).

Result for Marketing@company.com


 

Example 7:  The Controller (Controller@company.com) has access to the entire company for only GL Accounts balances but no access to splits or modeled or cube sheets.

Rule – The rule on row 21 gives the Controller Limited View to only GL Accounts.  Limited View restricts access to account splits and modeled sheet rows.  Granting access to GL Accounts gives access to all GL accounts.  Note that the P&L may include custom and metric accounts that may need to be added to the rule to provide access to the full P&L.  

 

Result for Controller@company.com:


  • Cet article vous a été utile ?